Socio-demographic factors associated with anaemia among non-pregnant and non-lactating women from low-income families in two selected districts of Madhya Pradesh state of India: a random forest analysis

Authors

  • Ranjan Kumar Jha India Country Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi, India
  • Sucharita Dutta India Country Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi, India
  • Ritu Ghosh Asia Regional Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi India
  • Archana Mishra Deputy Director, Maternal Health, National Health Mission, Government of Madhya Pradesh, India
  • J. C. Reddy Asia Regional Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi India
  • Suresh Lakshminarayanan India Country Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi, India
  • Aarati Pillai Asia Regional Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi India
  • Suvabrata Dey Asia Regional Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi India
  • Manoj Kumar Raut Asia Regional Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20223200

Keywords:

Anaemia, IFA supplementation, NPNLW, Mass media, Food fortification, low-income families, National iron plus initiative program

Abstract

Background: Anaemia is one of the most common public health challenges. The objective of this paper was to estimate the prevalence of anaemia among non-pregnant and non-lactating women (NPNLW) (15-49 years) from low-income families and to assess the associations between socio-demographic and economic factors, and the prevalence of anaemia.

Methods: Primary data of non-pregnant and non-lactating women of reproductive age (15 to 49 years) from low-income families collected from two selected districts of Madhya Pradesh state, India were used. Inferential statistical tools like; multiple binary logistic regressions and random forest analysis were adopted to assess the socio-demographic and economic factors associated with anaemia.

Results: The results revealed that prevalence of anaemia in both the districts are quite high at 60.8% (95% CI: 58.6%, 62.9%) in Vidisha to 63.7% (95% CI: 61.6%, 65.7%) in Raisen with mean haemoglobin levels of 11.27±1.92 g/dl in Vidisha to 11.24±1.70 g/dl in Raisen, which is close to <12 g/dl cut-off based on WHO categorization. It was also found that those who are from the scheduled caste and other castes were less likely to be anaemic compared to those who were from scheduled tribes in Vidisha district. Majority of women not consuming iron supplements were found to be anaemic.

Conclusions: Education was observed to be the most predominant factor inversely associated with anaemia. Age and the type of household were also found to be associated factors. Along with supplementation and nutrition education, fortification of foods is also recommended in addressing the anaemia burden.

Author Biography

Ranjan Kumar Jha, India Country Office, Nutrition International, New Delhi, India

Dr Manoj Kumar Raut is the Asia Regional Technical Advisor for Research and Evaluations at Nutrition International. He is a trained demographer, biostatistician, and researcher with more than two decades of experience of working at international, national and regional levels in program management, monitoring, statistical analyses, research and evaluation. He has published several papers in peer-reviewed journals. He has a doctorate in Population Studies from the International Institute for Population Sciences, India with a specialization in Biostatistics and an MPhil and a Masters in Psychology. He is also trained at the Cornell University, Ithaca and Oxford University, England.

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Published

2022-11-28

How to Cite

Jha, R. K., Dutta, S., Ghosh, R., Mishra, A., Reddy, J. C., Lakshminarayanan, S., Pillai, A., Dey, S., & Raut, M. K. (2022). Socio-demographic factors associated with anaemia among non-pregnant and non-lactating women from low-income families in two selected districts of Madhya Pradesh state of India: a random forest analysis. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, 9(12), 4463–4471. https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20223200

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Original Research Articles