Assessment of quality of mid-day meal in Khamanon, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab

Authors

  • Harpreet Kaur USAID Infectious Disease Detection and Surveillance (IDDS) at ICF Incorporated LLC, New Delhi, India
  • Pritam Halder Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India https://orcid.org/0009-0008-2407-6807
  • Rachana Srivastava Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
  • Tarundeep Singh Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
  • Poonam Khanna Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20241849

Keywords:

Punjab, Food quality, Mid-day meal, Nutrient, Schools

Abstract

Background: Mid-day meal (MDM) is a scheme implemented by Government of India to combat the problem of malnourishment. Periodic assessment of the food and nutritional quality of mid-day meals being served to the school children for nutrient consumption is imperative. This study was designed to evaluate the quality of food served under MDM.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in randomly selected 11 government schools of Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab (May-July, 2018). The cooked food samples were evaluated for assessing the food quality of MDM in different schools with respect to colour, consistency and taste by a panel of 5-6 judges. The amount of food grains, pulses, vegetables, etc. provided to all the upper primary school children were recorded and then evaluated for the nutritive content (calories, protein, fat) of MDM and its contribution per day.

Results: In the present study, energy as well as protein requirement was fulfilled by mid-day meal but was low for fat (2.4 gm). The quantity of mid-day meal provided was adequate except for the vegetables (leafy also). Usage of green leafy vegetables was low (42 gm), served once in a week. There was 76% adequacy of nutrient intake in the present study.

Conclusions: The present study shows that improvement in the quality and quantity of the Mid-day meal is essential to fill the nutrient gap. There is a need to improve fat content of the meal, as it was low. More leafy vegetables should be included in the meal or their substitutes should be encouraged.

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Published

2024-06-28

How to Cite

Kaur, H., Halder, P., Srivastava, R., Singh, T., & Khanna, P. (2024). Assessment of quality of mid-day meal in Khamanon, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, 11(7), 2852–2858. https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20241849

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Original Research Articles