Caffeine consumption among medical students: an exploratory study in a medical school in a sub–Himalayan state of India

Authors

  • Ujjwala Gangwal Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College GMC Jammu, Jammu & Kashmir, India
  • Mehak T. Mir Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College GMC Jammu, Jammu & Kashmir, India
  • Rajiv K. Gupta Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College GMC Jammu, Jammu & Kashmir, India
  • Rishab Gupta Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College GMC Jammu, Jammu & Kashmir, India
  • Chaitanya Kailu Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College GMC Jammu, Jammu & Kashmir, India
  • Mahendra S. Dhadawad Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College GMC Jammu, Jammu & Kashmir, India
  • Reenu Padha Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College GMC Jammu, Jammu & Kashmir, India
  • Khalid H. Naik Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College GMC Jammu, Jammu & Kashmir, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20241841

Keywords:

Caffeine, Prevalence, Medical students

Abstract

Background: Among the psychostimulants, caffeine is the most commonly used compound with beneficial effects in low to moderate intake. Medical students due to extended scholastic work do indulge in caffeine intake. The present study aimed to explore the prevalence, determinants and its positive and negative effects among medical students in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Jammu, India.

Methods: The present cross sectional study was conducted in the month of December, 2023. Online questionnaire was shared with all the undergraduate MBBS students of the medical school and were directed to submit their responses. Data thus collected was entered into Excel spread sheet and analysed.

Results: Prevalence of caffeine intake among the respondents was 85.7%. The most common caffeinated beverage consumed was tea followed by coffee while energy drinks were least consumed. Among the reasons for consumption, feeling refreshed and combating drowsiness were cited as two main reasons. Respondents reported gastritis (41%), insomnia (30%), anxiety (18%) and palpitation (18%) as major side effects post consumption.

Conclusions: The frequency of caffeine use among the respondents was more on the regular days in contrast to stress related exam days as reported in other studies. Intake of caffeinated beverages favourable time was morning. More studies are recommended to study long term results of consumption of caffeinated beverages.

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Published

2024-06-28

How to Cite

Gangwal, U., Mir, M. T., Gupta, R. K., Gupta, R., Kailu, C., Dhadawad, M. S., Padha, R., & Naik, K. H. (2024). Caffeine consumption among medical students: an exploratory study in a medical school in a sub–Himalayan state of India. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, 11(7), 2799–2804. https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20241841

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Original Research Articles