Assessment of clinical profile among hypertensive patients, Meru, Kenya

Authors

  • Elizabeth W. Kathuri Department of Nursing, Meru University of Science and Technology, Nchiru, Meru, Kenya
  • Catherine Gichunge Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Public Health, Chuka University, Chuka, Meru, Kenya
  • Lucy K. Gitonga Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Public Health, Chuka University, Chuka, Meru, Kenya

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20240255

Keywords:

Clinical profile, Comorbidity, Hypertensive patients, Blood pressure control, Kenya

Abstract

Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Globally, more than 1.28 billion adults are hypertensive and in Kenya, 24% of adult population has elevated blood pressure and 56% of these have never been screened for hypertension. Assessment of clinical profile helps guide the management of hypertensive patients towards obtaining normal blood pressure levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical profile of hypertensive patients at the Meru Teaching and Referral Hospital in Kenya.

Methods: A cross sectional survey was conducted and systematic random sampling was used to sample 75 hypertensive patients who participated in the study. The collected data were summarized using frequencies and percentages. Chi square was used to assess the relationship between the participants’ demographic characteristics, clinical profile and hypertension. Statistical significance was set at p≤0.05.

Results: The average mean age of the participants was 58.53 years and majority were female (52%). Thirty-three (33.3%) were overweight and 24% were obese. The mean body mass index (BMI) for both genders was 26.48±5.24, the mean waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and waist circumference (WC) was 0.94 and 102.09 respectively with 85.3% of the participants having a substantially increased WHR. Diabetes was the most common comorbidity (70.73%). Of the five clinical profiles assessed (BMI, RBS, WHR, presence of comorbidities and drug used) only the presence of comorbidity was associated with BP levels χ2 (10.01,3), p=0.018.

Conclusions: Participants had high blood pressure, BMI, WHR and WC readings as well as several comorbidities.

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Published

2024-01-31

How to Cite

Kathuri, E. W., Gichunge, C., & Gitonga, L. K. (2024). Assessment of clinical profile among hypertensive patients, Meru, Kenya. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, 11(2), 685–690. https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20240255

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Original Research Articles