Understanding menstrual health and related health-seeking behavior in adolescent girls at a tribal welfare school in Vikarabad: a cross-sectional analysis

Authors

  • Shravya Lakkakula Department of Public Health, Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Nirupama A. Y. Department of Public Health, Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Yashaswini Kumar Department of Public Health, Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
  • Srinivas Rao Imandi Department of Public Health, Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20233443

Keywords:

Adoloscent tribal girls, Menstruation, Knowledge, Health-seeking behavior

Abstract

Background: Adolescent girls often lack adequate knowledge and comfort when accessing reproductive health care and information. A woman’s health at different stages in her life is interconnected, such that the state of her menstrual health at present can influence her reproductive, sexual, and maternal health in the future. Therefore, possessing adequate understanding and awareness regarding menstruation and recognizing the significance of seeking healthcare will help in managing menstruation hygienically and with dignity.

Methods: A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in a tribal welfare residential school in a rural setting among female adolescent girls in classes 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, during September 2022 for 10 days, with objectives to assess knowledge about menstruation and to determine the health-seeking behaviour for menstrual health among them.

Results: In our study of 73 adolescent tribal girls (mean age: 13.86±1.33), 73.9% had a high knowledge level about menstruation. Self-medication was reported by 26%, while only 9.6% consulted a doctor. Higher menstrual pain was linked to a 3.25 times higher likelihood of consulting a doctor and a 5.5 times higher likelihood of self-medication.

Conclusions: While a majority of tribal adolescent girls demonstrated a good level of knowledge regarding menstruation, only 9.6% of them sought medical consultation from a doctor. A comprehensive approach that combines health education, challenging cultural taboos, and improving access to healthcare services is necessary to promote better healthcare-seeking behaviour among adolescent girls regarding menstruation.

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Published

2023-10-31

How to Cite

Lakkakula, S., A. Y., N., Kumar, Y., & Imandi, S. R. (2023). Understanding menstrual health and related health-seeking behavior in adolescent girls at a tribal welfare school in Vikarabad: a cross-sectional analysis. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, 10(11), 4153–4157. https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20233443

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Original Research Articles