An inconspicuous threat to our nation-it’s time to end

Authors

  • Abinav Sivakumar Department of Community Medicine, Chettinad Hospital and Research Institute, Kelambakkam, Tamil Nadu, India
  • Anugraha John Faculty of Medicine, Sri Lalithambigai Medical College and Hospital, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20232709

Keywords:

Counterfeit medicine, Over-the-counter medicines, Falsified drugs, Adverse drug reaction, Drug resistance

Abstract

It is well known that counterfeit medical products cause harm to patients and fail to treat the diseases for which they were intended. They lead to loss of confidence in medicines, healthcare providers and health systems. They are becoming common in every region of the world. It is believed that up to 10% of all medicines sold worldwide are counterfeit, with higher prevalence in regions where drug regulatory and enforcement systems are weakest. An estimated 1 in 10 medical products in low- and middle-income countries and it contributes to antimicrobial resistance and drug-resistant infections.

References

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Published

2023-08-29

How to Cite

Sivakumar, A., & John, A. (2023). An inconspicuous threat to our nation-it’s time to end. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, 10(9), 3403–3405. https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20232709

Issue

Section

Letter to the Editor