Dynamics of changes in expenditures on medical services over the last ten years, their structure in parallel with the dynamics of changes in health indicators

Authors

  • Gulnara Abashidze-Gabaidze Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Faculty of Medicine Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Lasha Loria Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Faculty of Medicine Tbilisi, Georgia
  • Mishiko Gabaidze Caucasus university, Tbilisi, Georgia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20231711

Keywords:

Healthcare services, Local government, Self-government, Public healthcare, Insurance

Abstract

Despite increasing public spending on healthcare in Georgia, the country still needs to catch up to the world health organization's (WHO) recommendation of allocating at least 15% of public expenditure on healthcare. As a result, the population must pay high medical service costs. Additionally, the quality of healthcare in Georgia needs to improve. Chronic diseases are particularly prevalent, and lifestyle risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol consumption, low physical activity, and unhealthy diet contribute to their development. This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of state programs in Georgia and compare them with the best working model of world health recommendations. It also aims to identify factors contributing to the development of chronic diseases in Georgia. The research methodology is a meta-analysis, where have been used reports of the national health of Georgia, there have been discussed the results of all state programs operating in Georgia-to analyze the dynamics of changes in health indicators in Georgia over the last ten years. The study finds that public funding for healthcare in Georgia is increasing yearly, but the country still needs to catch up to the WHO's recommendation. The population must pay excessive costs for medical services, and the quality of healthcare remains low. Lifestyle risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol consumption, low physical activity, and unhealthy diet contribute to developing chronic diseases in Georgia. The study also finds that the cost-effectiveness of state programs in Georgia could be better compared to global best practices. The study concludes that despite increasing trends in public funding expenditures in Georgia, healthcare quality remains low. The development of chronic diseases in Georgia is due to lifestyle risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol consumption, low physical activity, and an unhealthy diet. The cost-effectiveness of state programs in Georgia needs improvement, and global best practices should be considered. The study highlights the need for increased public spending on healthcare in Georgia and better resource utilization to achieve better health outcomes.

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Published

2023-05-31

How to Cite

Abashidze-Gabaidze, G., Loria, L., & Gabaidze, M. (2023). Dynamics of changes in expenditures on medical services over the last ten years, their structure in parallel with the dynamics of changes in health indicators. International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health, 10(6), 2240–2249. https://doi.org/10.18203/2394-6040.ijcmph20231711

Issue

Section

Meta-Analysis